Betty Mason, Blueberry Circle, Lumberton; Thomas Jacobs, Union Chapel Road, Lumberton; Heather Clark, Oakgrove Church Road, Lumberton; Abraham Lopez, Sugar Drive, St. Pauls; Robert Brown, Rennert Road, Shannon; Billy Burns, Littlefield Acres Loop Road, Lumberton; Chris Williams, Fairley Road, Maxton; Eliza Lucas, Rex Road, St. Pauls; Nicole Cross, East Tobemory Road, Parkton; Dollar General Inc., Union Chapel Road, Pembroke; Sofia Rivas, Harolds Drive, Red Springs; Christopher Croom, N.C. 71 North, Maxton; Darlene Locklear, Trinity Road, Lumberton; Murphy Brown, Watts Dairy Road, St. Pauls; and Arnulfo Soto, Bovine Drive, Lumberton.

Family Dollar, Ward Store Road, Fairmont; Donna Groom, Shady Lane, Maxton; Dollar General, Union Chapel Road, Pembroke; Carlie Sanderson, Mt. Olive Church Road, Lumberton; and Kayla Wilkins, Pinwheel Circle, Lumberton.

The following victims reported Friday to the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office that they suffered serious injuries as the result of an assault by someone with a weapon:



Seth Strickland, of Brown Road in Red Springs, reported Friday to the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office that he was the victim of an armed robbery.

Courtney Hunt, of Graham Circle in Lumberton, reported Sunday to the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office that a burglary occurred at her residence.

Kayla Wilkins, of Pinwheel Circle in Lumberton, reported Sunday to the Lumberton Police Department that while her car was parked at Walmart Neighborhood Market, located at 2985 E. Elizabethtown Road, someone stole a safe and its contents from the trunk of her car. Wilkins reported the stolen items included a .40 caliber Smith & Wesson semi-automatic handgun, valued at $400; a 9mm Ruger handgun, valued at $370; two holsters, valued at $15 each; three cases of bullets, valued at $20 each; and an ID, valued at $10.

Ola Hall, of Hollywood Drive in Lumberton, reported Sunday to the Lumberton Police Department that someone broke into her 2001 Ford F-150 while it was parked at East Lumberton Church of God, located at 100 Dresden Ave, and caused $400 in damages to the driver’s side window. Hall also reported that ham and cheese sandwiches were stolen from the vehicle.

Lanny Lowery, of North Roberts Avenue in Lumberton, reported Sunday to the Lumberton Police Department that someone broke into his vehicle and stole a cordless DeWALT drill, valued at $50; and caused $500 in damages to the rear window and $250 in damages to the rear passenger window.

Rachel Walters, of Idlewood Street in Lumberton, reported Sunday to the Lumberton Police Department that someone stole a Omni 50-inch Smart TV, valued at $300, from her residence.

Monica Kyle, of Leggett Street in Lumberton, reported Saturday to the Lumberton Police Department that someone stole her 2000 Acura sedan, valued at $3,500, from her residence.

Jimmy Godwin, of Alexander Street in Lumberton, reported Saturday to the Lumberton Police Department that someone stole a .45 caliber Taurus handgun, valued at $300, from his residence.

Jeremy Scott, owner of Perfect Lawn Care LLC, reported Friday to the Lumberton Police Department that someone stole a Husqvarna backpack blower, valued at $619.99, from a trailer while it was parked at Griffin Apartments, located at 1970 N. Roberts Ave.

LUMBERTON — The Robeson Community College trustees and leadership cheered on Thursday after being told of a 24.4% increase in enrollment in 2019, making the increase the largest in the N.C. Community College System.

The system recently released information showing that enrollment increased at 53 of the state’s 58 community colleges in 2019, and RCC topped that list percentage-wise. Fall 2019 enrollment at RCC was 1,941 compared with 1,719 in the fall of 2018.

“We are extremely happy with our growth,” RCC President Melissa Singler said. “This is truly a testament of the hard work of the entire Robeson Community College team.”

At RCC, the college’s peak enrollment came in the 2010-11 school year when it had 3,951 students. The school reported in July that the budgeted enrollment for the upcoming school year was 2,667, a decline of about 32% from that peak year. Because of the decline, college leaders did not renew the contracts of six employees and reduced the number of months of employment per year for 21 other employees.

Singler and board Chairman Sammy Cox Jr. attributed the growth to the Workforce Development and Continuing Education Department.

In a press release, Peter Hans, president of the N.C. Community College System, noted a number of factors that have contributed to the surge. Those include innovation and leadership at local community colleges, more focus on workforce training and a new marketing campaign that is promoting the state’s community colleges.

“Our short-term workforce programs are leading students to good jobs in manufacturing, information technology, health care, transportation and other fields,” Hans said. “With a small investment of time and money in these programs, students can begin a rewarding new career that can sustain them and their families.”

The main key to growth in the department was researching the job market and figuring out where there was a need, said Steven Hunt, RCC’s vice president for Workforce Development and Continuing Education.

In the past year, the department has created a massage class, a dialysis course and rebooted the barbering course.

Hunt, a fan of metrics, also said he had his staff meet regularly to study the metrics to try to project the areas of growth and meet those projections.

“We continue to look at new opportunities and new programs to build on the already dynamic programming we offer in both workforce development and curriculum,” Singler said. “We are here to meet the educational, workforce development and training needs of Robeson County and our region.”

Also at Thursday’s meeting, the trustees came out of a closed session and unanimously voted to create a vice president of Information Technology and chief information officer position and promoted Dustin Long, the assistant vice president of Information Technology and chief information officer, to that position.

The board also heard from Jamie Collins, the director of N.C. Works Customized Training Program. Collins gave the trustees an update on the newest Defensive Driving Courses, which began that evening.

The class is designed to give traffic offenders the option of taking a four-hour course to clear a traffic violation from their record and prevent an insurance rate increase while also promoting safer driving.

Offenders targeted for the training are people who speed, fail to stop at stop signs, and text while driving.

Two classes are being offered. The Alive at 25 class, which is geared toward drivers under the age of 25, and the Defensive Driving Course, for ages 25 and older. The classes are taught by state Highway Patrol troopers Jason Oxendine and Cory Lowry.

CHARLOTTE — Valentine’s Day is here to inspire dreams and hopes of finding love, but the FBI warns that seeking romance online can lead to the nightmare of a broken heart and financial ruin.

The FBI is working to raise awareness of the threat of online romance scams, according to an FBI release. Scammers take advantage of people looking for romantic partners on dating websites, apps, or social media by obtaining access to their financial or personal identifying information.

— Research the person’s photo and profile using online searches to see if the material has been used elsewhere.

— Beware if the individual seems too perfect or quickly asks you to leave a dating service or social media site to go “offline.”

— Beware if the individual promises to meet in person but then always comes up with an excuse why he or she can’t. If you haven’t met the person after a few months, for whatever reason, you have good reason to be suspicious.

A woman in her 50s and struggling in her marriage met someone online who claimed to be a friend of a friend. The woman was happy to have found someone to chat with.

“He was saying all the right things,” she said. “He was interested in me. He was interested in getting to know me better. He was very positive, and I felt like there was a real connection there.”

That connection would end up costing the woman $2 million and an untold amount of heartache after the man she fell in love with — whom she never met in person — took her for every cent she had.

That sort of internet crime is on the rise, according to the FBI. The victims predominantly are older widowed or divorced women who are, for the most part, computer literate and educated. But they are emotionally vulnerable. And con artists know exactly how to exploit that vulnerability because potential victims freely post details about their lives and personalities on dating and social media sites.

Trolling for victims online “is like throwing a fishing line,” said Special Agent Christine Beining, a veteran financial fraud investigator in the FBI’s Houston Division who has seen a substantial increase in the number of romance scam cases. “The internet makes this type of crime easy because you can pretend to be anybody you want to be. You can be anywhere in the world and victimize people. The perpetrators will reach out to a lot of people on various networking sites to find somebody who may be a good target. Then they use what the victims have on their profile pages and try to work those relationships and see which ones develop.

“The internet makes this type of crime easy because you can pretend to be anybody you want to be.”

In the case of the Texas woman who lost everything, it was her strong Christian faith, which she publicized on her Facebook profile. This information gave “Charlie” an incredible advantage when he began courting her.

“I’m very active on Facebook,” said the woman, who agreed to share her story in the hopes that others might avoid becoming victims. “I thought it was safe.”

After she friended Charlie — without verifying his bogus claim that they had a mutual friend — “he would read my wall, I would read his wall,” she said. “We would post things, he would like things. Then it got to where we would share e-mails. We started sharing pictures.”

According to Beining, this is standard operating procedure for romance scammers, who assume other people’s identities to trick their victims.

“They make themselves out to be average-looking people,” the agent said. “They are generally not trying to build themselves up too high.”

The scammer’s intention is to establish a relationship as quickly as possible, endear himself to the victim, gain trust, and propose marriage, she said. He will make plans to meet in person, but that will never happen. Eventually, he will ask for money.

According to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, which provides the public with a means of reporting internet-facilitated crimes, romance scams result in the highest amount of financial losses to victims when compared with other online crimes.

Anyone who believes he or she is a victim of a romance scam should file a complaint online at www.ic3.gov.

LUMBERTON — Two St. Pauls men were arrested Wednesday after a traffic stop that led to the seizure of drugs, according to the Sheriff’s Office

James Robert Inman III, 29, and Martize Douglas, 29, are charged with possession with intent to sell or deliver heroin, possession with intent to sell or deliver methamphetamine, possession with intent to sell or deliver cocaine, maintaining a drug vehicle, and possession of drug paraphernalia, according to the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office.

Inman also was charged with possession of firearm by a felon. He was placed in the Robeson County Detention Center under a $500,000 secured bond.

Because of a probation violation, Douglas was served with an outstanding order for arrest, according to the Sheriff’s Office. He was placed under a $510,000 secured bond.

Sheriff’s deputies stopped a 2003 Ford Taurus, operated by Inman and Douglas, for a fictitious license plate on Broad Street in St Pauls. Quantities of heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, drug paraphernalia, a firearm and $373 in cash were seized after a search of the vehicle.

Anyone with information regarding drug activity in Robeson County should call the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office Drug Enforcement Division at 910-671-3191.

ST. PAULS — A 29-year-old Lumber Bridge man already charged with murder was among four people arrested Wednesday and charged with numerous drug crimes, according to the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office.

Michael Blackwell, who was out on bond on charges of first-degree murder and discharging a weapon into an occupied property, was returned to the county jail under a $1.85 million secured bond. Blackwell is also on probation for trafficking cocaine.

He was arrested on Wednesday after Drug Enforcement Division investigators, deputies with the Community Impact Team and SWAT operators with the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office searched 390 Millionaire Road in St. Pauls and seized quantities of heroin, cocaine, Oxycodone pills, Suboxone strips, marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

Blackwell, Mickey Jeffries, 26, of St Pauls; Zebian Bullard, 23, of St Pauls; and Michael Blanks, 65, of Lumberton, are each charged with trafficking opium or heroin, possession with intent to sell or deliver heroin, conspiring to sell or deliver heroin, trafficking cocaine, possession with intent to sell or deliver cocaine, conspiring to sell or deliver cocaine, trafficking opioids, possession with intent to sell or deliver a Schedule II- and III-controlled substance, possession with intent to sell or deliver marijuana, maintaining a drug dwelling, and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Blackwell is one of four people charged in the Nov. 19, 2014, shooting death of Corey Bratcher, who was a senior at St. Pauls High School at the time of his death. Bratcher, 18, died after shots were fired into his Gina Boulevard home.

Blackwell was out after making a bond of $275,000. Three other men are out on bond in Bratcher’s murder. They are Angelo Burns of Shannon, $425,000 bond; Willie Fields of Lumber Bridge, $35,000 bond; and David Javon Morgan of Lumber Bridge, $55,000 bond.

Anyone with additional information or any information regarding drug activity in Robeson County is asked to call the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office Drug Enforcement Division at 910-671-3191.

I am thankful for the people who, when I was a child, led me to pray. The Lord’s Prayer was one I learned in elementary school when we began each day by praying this prayer and pledging allegiance to our nation’s flag.

At the time and for a considerable part of my life, the prayer was routine and came from my mind, not my heart. It was really not until adulthood that I studied the prayer and came to understand it is a perfect model that teaches us how to pray.

The prayer, given for our benefit by the Lord, consists of several parts and deserves careful attention. Christ Jesus said we should not pray using “vain repetitions, as the heathen do.” We must not be like them because our heavenly Father knows “what things ye have need of before ye ask him,” said Jesus.

“After this manner,” He tells us. He did not say use these same words, and we do not find the apostles using this exact prayer. The Lord, who knows everything we need before we ask, gives us a pattern by which we should pray.

“Our Father” is the one to whom we pray, and there is so much that deals with our relationship in these two words. Humble yourself in obedience to the command, “Thou shalt have no other gods before me.” We must never pray to angels or saints. Pray only to our Creator who reconciled us to Himself through His precious Son.

To hallow the name of God is the same as saying His name is holy, and to recognize the attributes we know about God. He is holy, just, merciful, gracious and so much more. Our purpose is always to glorify God.

We anticipate the Second Coming of Christ Jesus when He will set up His kingdom. Sin, sadness and even Satan will not be present in that kingdom. We understand that in the present our happiness comes through submission to His will. Our desire is for all believers to be more and more obedient to the Lord.

“Give us this day our daily bread,” He said. We ask our Father every day that in His mercy He will supply our necessities. The Jews called sins “debts.” Jesus said we ought to ask forgiveness of our sins, and we must be mindful to be as forgiving of other people as our Father is to us.

Ask, Jesus said, that we would be led away from temptations that would take us out of God’s will for our lives. God rules over everything and everybody in this world. It is well within His power to answer our prayers and grant our requests. May He always be honored and glorified.

Remember, Christ Jesus said, to have a heart for forgiveness. If we will not forgive other people, we cannot expect our Father to forgive us.

The Sunday school lesson is written by Ed Wilcox, pastor of Centerville Baptist Church. He can be reached at edwilcox@nc.rr.com.

LUMBERTON — Two Lumberton residents are charged with a series of violent crimes in relation to an assault that occurred during a robbery attempt, according to the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office.

Amber Little, 43, and Jose Hernandez ,40, both of Reagan Church Road, were arrested at their residence by Robeson County Sheriff’s Office investigators. Little and Hernandez are each charged with felony conspiracy, attempted robbery with a dangerous weapon, second-degree kidnapping, and assault with a deadly weapon.

Little was placed in the the Robeson County Detention Center under a $50,000 secured bond, and Hernandez under a $75,000 secured bond.

According to the Sheriff’s Office, on Sunday at about 5:43 p.m., sheriff’s deputies were called to Cape Fear Valley Medical Center in Fayetteville in regard to an assault that occurred in Robeson County. Dilte Perez, of Lumberton, told deputies he was assaulted during a robbery try on Reagan Church Road.

Anyone with information about this case is asked to contact Robeson County Sheriff’s Office at 910-671-3170 or 910-671-3100.

RED SPRINGS — A Shannon man has been arrested and charged with a break-in at a Dollar General store, according to the Red Springs Police Department.

Jonathan Locklear, 27, of 255 Cook Road, was arrested Tuesday and charged with breaking and entering on the same day the store at 908 E. Fourth Ave. was broken into, according to information from police Maj. Kimothy Monroe. Locklear was placed under a $5,000 secured bond.

Police were called about 11:30 p.m. about a burglary at the Dollar General store, according to Monroe, and were given a description of the culprit. Soon afterward a person matching the description was seen walking in the parking lot at Baker Chevrolet at 914 E. Fourth Ave. Monroe said Locklear was caught hiding under a vehicle.

LUMBERTON — Robeson County ranks in the top 20 for number of roads in the Adopt-A-Highway program, but continues to struggle with the unsightliness of roadside trash, officials say.

There are 1,800 miles of state-maintained roads, including interstates, highways and secondary roads, in the county, according to Andrew Barksdale, public information officer for the N.C. Department of Transportation.

Robeson County ranks No. 17 in the number of groups and adopted routes in the Adopt-A-Highway program, Barksdale said. Wake, Union and Guilford counties make up the top three.

In 2017, Robeson County ranked third in the state in total miles with 1,786 miles, behind Wake and Guilford counties, Barksdale said.

The county has 80 roads in the program that calls for volunteers to adopt a two-mile stretch of roadway to keep clean over four years, according to program Coordinator Lillian Hunt. Litter pickups are required at least four times per year on those roads, she said.

“I think we’ve made a large move into adopting highways, but we have a lot farther to go,” Hunt said.

“We do the best we can, but it’s not possible to keep all the roads pristine all the time without the help of volunteers like these in Robeson County who really care about their county,” Barksdale said.

Robeson County’s litter problem is so big that county commissioners established Clean and Green, which is an initiative to clean up roads and to stop littering. A meeting was held Tuesday during which the possibility of using cameras at high-litter areas was floated.

The Community Service Program provides people to clean up collection sites across the county to complete community service sentences, Walters said. The Robeson County Sheriff’s Office also works in roadside cleanup with inmates, and the Statewide Misdemeanant Confinement Program allows the county Detention Center to house eight inmates from counties across the state to participate in the collection of litter.

Solid Waste is also promoting the Adopt-A-Highway Program and cleanup efforts led by county commissioners in their districts, he said.

Edge took the lead in developing the project in 2019 as a way to educate elementary children on the problem of littering. Teachers from elementary schools across the county will meet March 16 at the Public Schools of Robeson County Central Office to discuss adopting a five-day kindergarten through fifth-grade program to be taught annually around Earth Day. The program will educate children on the effects of littering.

The county has three environmental control officers who issue citations for littering. Fines start at $250.

“The county has made resources for citizens to properly dispose of their waste,” said Kristina Locklear-Cummings, assistant director for Recycling at the Department of Solid Waste.

There are 20 sites across the county for waste disposal. Those hours of operation are Mondays to Saturdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays from 1 to 6 p.m.

Participation in North Carolina’s Adopt-A-Highway program is free, according to the N.C. Department of Transportation. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and children 12 to 17 must be supervised by an adult who is at least 21 years old.

To volunteer with Adopt-A-Highway, interested groups should first use the litter management map to determine roadway availability and then to request a segment when submitting their application online or by mail.

LUMBERTON — The public is invited to comment Thursday on the closure plan, that includes removing more than 1.6 million tons of coal ash, for Duke Energy’s Weatherspoon Power Station.

The public hearing organized and sponsored by the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality will take place at South Robeson Intermediate School, located at 3268 S. Robeson Road in Rowland. Speaker sign-up begins at 5:30 p.m. and the hearing is to start at 6 p.m.

The hearing is required by state law to discuss Duke Energy’s plan for removing coal ash from the Weatherspoon site and closing it, said Bill Norton, a Duke spokesman. Duke Energy plans to have technical personnel at the meeting to answer any detail-oriented questions.

“Duke Energy is not presenting and doesn’t have any formal role in the meeting, but we’ll be there nonetheless in case the public has questions of us,” Norton said.

Comments recorded during Thursday’s hearing and those received at DEQ by March 5 will be used in determining if the state will approve the closure plan, according to information from the state agency. Written comments may be submitted to: Louise Hughes, N.C. Department of Environmental Quality, Attn: Louise Hughes 1601 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, N.C., 27699-1601. Public comments also may be submitted by email to: weatherspooncomments@ncdenr.gov.

Duke Energy submitted to the state on Dec. 30 its closure plan for the site located at 491 Power Plant Road in Lumberton. The DEQ’s final action on the closure plans is due within 120 days of receipt of the plan. Implementation of the plan must begin within 60 days of state approval.

The closure plan reads in part, “The facility was constructed starting in 1949. In February 2012, the three coalfired units were retired. The coal-fired generating units have been demolished and removed from the site. There are no longer any CCR (Coal Combustion Residuals) disposal operations within the Basin areas with the permanent retirement of the coal generating units. The Weatherspoon Station ceased all waste flows to the Basin in 2012. Removal of the CCR by excavation for beneficiation began in August 2017.”

The excavation that began in 2017 was the result of a solution Duke Energy reached with environmental groups and state regulators, and was sparked by concerns that water was leaking from the basin that contained 2.5 million tons of coal ash and the tainted water was flowing into the nearby Lumber River. The original plan called for the ash to be dried and then shipped to South Carolina, where it would be deposited in abandoned mines. Environmental concerns were raised and that plan was halted.

The coal ash still is being shipped to South Carolina, David McNeill, a manager of a Duke Energy district that covers eight counties, including Robeson, said in January for an earlier report by The Robesonian. Now the ash is being recycled as filler for the making of concrete.

“The primary objective of this Closure Plan is to address the closure by excavation of the CCR from the Basin at the Weatherspoon Station pursuant to North Carolina Coal Ash Management Act of 2014, Session L. 2014-122, as amended (CAMA),” the plan reads in part. “A further objective is to obtain approval from the NCDEQ to proceed and develop the additional details (as described further within this Closure Plan) and necessary working documents to complete the closure actions. Duke Energy is requesting approval of this Closure Plan with the knowledge that other details will follow.”

— Construction and operation of a temporary water management system to manage discharges in compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit during closure.

— Grading dikes into the basin with a grading plan that will establish drainage to promote flow of stormwater out of the former basin in a manner protective of area soils and water.

LUMBERTON — A Fairmont man has been arrested and charged with a recent theft at McNeill Jewelers in Lumberton, according to the Lumberton Police Department.

Michael Dewitt Oxendine, 35, was arrested about 2:26 p.m. Wednesday and charged with two counts of felony larceny related to the theft of a gold rope chain and gold Indian head charm stolen from the jewelry store in Biggs Park Mall, according to police. The stolen items had a combined value of more than $16,000.

On Saturday at 8:13 p.m. Lumberton police officers were dispatched to McNeill Jewelers after receiving a report that a customer stole jewelry and fled from the store. Officers identified Oxendine through surveillance video and items he left behind. Lumberton police detectives subsequently obtained arrest warrants for Oxendine for two counts of felony larceny.

The department later released the surveillance video on social media and asked the public’s help in locating Oxendine.

Charges against him range from breaking and entering, larceny after breaking and entering, and failure to report new address as a sex offender, according to a statement by the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office.

LUMBERTON — Area residents are invited to offer their thoughts and comments about their communities’ resiliency against natural disasters on Feb. 20.

The public hearing about the Bladen-Columbus-Robeson Regional Hazard Mitigation Plan is to start at 4 p.m. and will take place in the Robeson County Emergency Operations Center training room. Comments will be considered during the final decision-making process.

Bladen, Columbus and Robeson counties, in coordination with participating municipalities, are finalizing a regional hazard mitigation plan that covers the three-county area. The Bladen-Columbus-Robeson Regional Hazard Mitigation Plan identifies local policies and actions for reducing risk and future losses from natural hazards such as floods, severe storms, wildfires and winter weather.

Contact Kay Worley, Columbus County Emergency Management, at kworley@columbusco.org of visit https://gis.aecomonline.net/IRISK2/NCHMP.aspx?region=17. for more information

LUMBERTON — The Robeson County Republican Women’s Club will meet on Tuesday at Adelio’s Restaurant in Lumberton.

Dinner is optional and is $15. Arrive at 6:30 p.m. to order dinner and at 7 p.m. to hear the speakers. The public is welcome.

GOP candidates in the March 3 primary election have been invited to speak. Confirmed speakers are N.C. House member Rep. Craig Horn, a candidate for N.C. Superintendent of Public Instruction; Tim Hoegemeyer, candidate for N.C. Auditor; and Patricia LaPaglia, wife of Michael LaPaglia, candidate for N.C. Secretary of State.

PEMBROKE — Freda Porter has been selected to serve as interim president of Lumbee Tribe Enterprises LLC, tribal leaders announced Thursday evening. The new position is effective Monday, but comes with conditions. The appointment, made […]

LUMBERTON — The Robeson Community College trustees and leadership cheered on Thursday after being told of a 24.4% increase in enrollment in 2019, making the increase the largest in the N.C. Community College System. The […]

CHARLOTTE — Valentine’s Day is here to inspire dreams and hopes of finding love, but the FBI warns that seeking romance online can lead to the nightmare of a broken heart and financial ruin. The […]

LUMBERTON — Two St. Pauls men were arrested Wednesday after a traffic stop that led to the seizure of drugs, according to the Sheriff’s Office James Robert Inman III, 29, and Martize Douglas, 29, are […]

ST. PAULS — A 29-year-old Lumber Bridge man already charged with murder was among four people arrested Wednesday and charged with numerous drug crimes, according to the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office. Michael Blackwell, who was […]

As time goes by, it becomes increasingly difficult to believe that President Richard Nixon was forced to resign from office — ultimately by his fellow Republicans — because of his corrupt political acts and those […]

Matthew 6:9-15 I am thankful for the people who, when I was a child, led me to pray. The Lord’s Prayer was one I learned in elementary school when we began each day by praying […]

GREENWOOD, S.C. — The 17th-ranked University of North Carolina at Pembroke men’s basketball team turned 17 offensive rebounds into 23 second-chance points and used a big run late in the second half to pull away […]

PEMBROKE — Even with The University of North Carolina at Pembroke baseball team posting double-digit runs for the third straight game on Wednesday in a 14-3 non-conference home win against Chowan, coach Paul O’Neil still […]

LUMBERTON — One word that Byrce Stueck and Jon Villa both said about their relationship with each other on the diamond is “chemistry.” That’s the norm with pitchers and catchers, and on Wednesday the Lumberton […]

LUMBERTON — When looking for a source of energy on Wednesday night after playing a double-overtime game the night before, the Lumberton boys basketball team had to channel frustration from that heart-wrenching loss. In doing […]

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